“The Little Princess” Storybook (Part 3): To the Orphanage

“The Little Princess” storybook text continues:

(Left side):
in the storybook itself:

Until one day, when she was sent away to a strange house.

subtitle given:

And the poor little girl was sent away to a strange house.

The accompanying illustration is of a man pulling the girl by the arm as he walks, and the girl is holding the little princess doll by the hand with her other hand. An interesting feature of this man is that he has a mustache. This is interesting because neither Gregory Wilson, nor Mr. Hoffman, are depicted as having a mustache at any point in the Rule of Rose game… and those two men are the only adult males that we ever encounter during the game.
The illustration also shows a couple of trees to the left, near one of which stands Stray Dog (standing like a man, but having the head of a dog). In the distance is what appears to be a house behind a wall… presumably the orphanage.

This is where the storybook ends when Jennifer is at the bus stop during “The Little Princess” chapter of Rule of Rose. The page on the right doesn’t appear until Joshua (in the attic of the orphanage, during “The Little Princess” chapter of Rule of Rose) asks Jennifer to read more of the storybook. Now the page on the right will temporarily mark the ending of “The Little Princess” storybook, until the text once again extends. See my blog-post: “The Continually Growing Storybook (‘The Little Princess’)
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(Right side):

At her new home, the Aristocrat Club lived by the Rule of Rose. But the girl found herself very much alone.

The accompanying illustration shows seven girls standing amidst seven long-stem roses:

The tall girl with a kerchief-tie is Diana.

The girl with the birdcage is Eleanor.

The girl wearing glasses is Meg.

The rotund girl is Amanda.

The girl with pig tails is Susan.

The small girl remaining is presumably Olivia.

Clara is not depicted here, or anywhere else in this storybook.

Wendy is not ever depicted in this storybook, at least not as a little girl. Does the little princess doll, later on in the storybook, represent her? I’ll discuss that question in a future blog-post.
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There are a number of mysteries that we now face in trying to explain the story of “The Little Princess” storybook:

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“The Little Princess” Storybook (Part 2), Airship Crash

“The Little Princess” storybook continues:

Then one day, her mummy and daddy died suddenly.

The Princess, too, disappeared, and the girl was left all alone.

The subtitling for this page ends the second sentence “leaving the girl all alone”, but the actual writing inside of the storybook itself ends the sentence “and the girl was left all alone.”

One can get a good look at this part of “The Little Princess” storybook by downloading the pdf file. See my previous post: Download or Print Out Rule of Rose Storybooks

The storybook illustration shows an airship with the name “Rose 03″ on it. This name puzzles me. Was the airship on which Jennifer and her parents traveled, and crashed, truly named “Rose 03″? It seems like quite a coincidence: Jennifer went from traveling on the airship “Rose 03″ to living at the “Rose Garden” orphanage.

I can easily imagine that the fantasy airship of the orphan’s airship game might be named “Rose” to match the name of the orphanage. After all, the orphans are pretending that the orphanage itself is an airship. But the airship of the storybook illustration is not that fantasy airship. It is the airship on which Jennifer’s parents died when the airship crashed.

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The Continually Growing Storybook (“The Little Princess”)

The Little Princess storybook coverThe Little Princess storybook blank~

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It is amazing to me that, as much as I have studied the Rule of Rose game, I can still discover important features of the story that I had missed up until now.

The continual growth of the text of “The Little Princess” storybook, as the Rule of Rose game progresses, is a story element of which I was previously unaware. I must confess that I just let that storybook sit, without re-examination, in the Rubbish Bin, once I was able to clear it from my inventory during “The Unlucky Clover Field” chapter of the game. But the game-player misses an important part of the progression of the Rule of Rose story by doing this.

In all of my time spent on Rule of Rose forums, I don’t recall reading any posts mentioning the on-going growth of the text of “The Little Princess” storybook. I wonder, how many other players of the game know about it?

The growth of the “The Little Princess” storybook-text is well-known in “The Little Princess” chapter itself. When Jennifer first receives the storybook on the bus, it is blank except for the cover. At the bus stop, however, Jennifer finds that there is now a story that has appeared inside of the book. Later on, when Jennifer reaches the attic of the orphanage, Joshua prompts Jennifer to continue reading the story and Jennifer discovers that the story text has lengthened from what it was before. This much all Rule of Rose game-players know.

We were meant, however, by the game authors, to take a cue from this and to keep examining the storybook for further text-growth throughout the progression of the game. This cue, I’m afraid, went completely over my head. I put “The Little Princess” in the Rubbish Bin to make room in my inventory for other items, didn’t re-examine it, and thereby entirely missed that aspect of the progression of the Rule of Rose story.

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The “Stray Dog and the Lying Princess” Storybook Mystery (Part 1)

The “Stray Dog and the Lying Princess” storybook of Rule of Rose has a story that seems to be adapted from the fable by Aesop entitled “The Shepherd’s Boy and the Wolf” (commonly known as “The Boy Who Cried Wolf”).

Here is a translation of this fable by George Tyler Townsend:

The Shepherd’s Boy and the Wolf

A Shepherd-boy, who watched a flock of sheep near a village, brought out the villagers three or four times by crying out, “Wolf! Wolf!” and when his neighbors came to help him, laughed at them for their pains. The Wolf, however, did truly come at last. The Shepherd-boy, now really alarmed, shouted in an agony of terror: “Pray, do come and help me; the Wolf is killing the sheep”; but no one paid any heed to his cries, nor rendered any assistance. The Wolf, having no cause of fear, at his leisure lacerated or destroyed the whole flock.

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The “Once Upon a Time” Storybook Mystery (Part 1)

BearAndPrincessTiedBackToBack~
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The “Once Upon a Time” storybook, in Rule of Rose, has no text other than its title. So understanding it requires analyzing the pictures that tell its story.

The title, “Once Upon a Time” is on the cover, as is a picture of two chairs, with a coil of rope by one of the chairs.

Further into the storybook, we see two girls holding hands as they sit together in these chairs. By their holding hands we know that they are friends to each other.

Further still into the storybook we see that these two girls are bound by rope, each to their own chair, as they continue to sit side-by-side. I propose that this image is a variant on the image that we see in the picture that accompanies this post.

In the picture (above, accompanying this article) we see the Prince Joshua-the-bear doll tied to the Little Princess doll as they sit on the two throne chairs of the Aristocrat club.

You can get several better views of these two dolls tied together on the throne chairs, in context, in this You Tube video: Prince and Princess Tied Together On The Chairs.

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