Posts Tagged “storybooks”

“The Little Princess” storybook text continues:

(Left side):
in the storybook itself:

Until one day, when she was sent away to a strange house.

subtitle given:

And the poor little girl was sent away to a strange house.

The accompanying illustration is of a man pulling the girl by the arm as he walks, and the girl is holding the little princess doll by the hand with her other hand. An interesting feature of this man is that he has a mustache. This is interesting because neither Gregory Wilson, nor Mr. Hoffman, are depicted as having a mustache at any point in the Rule of Rose game… and those two men are the only adult males that we ever encounter during the game.
The illustration also shows a couple of trees to the left, near one of which stands Stray Dog (standing like a man, but having the head of a dog). In the distance is what appears to be a house behind a wall… presumably the orphanage.

This is where the storybook ends when Jennifer is at the bus stop during “The Little Princess” chapter of Rule of Rose. The page on the right doesn’t appear until Joshua (in the attic of the orphanage, during “The Little Princess” chapter of Rule of Rose) asks Jennifer to read more of the storybook. Now the page on the right will temporarily mark the ending of “The Little Princess” storybook, until the text once again extends. See my blog-post: “The Continually Growing Storybook (‘The Little Princess’)
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(Right side):

At her new home, the Aristocrat Club lived by the Rule of Rose. But the girl found herself very much alone.

The accompanying illustration shows seven girls standing amidst seven long-stem roses:

The tall girl with a kerchief-tie is Diana.

The girl with the birdcage is Eleanor.

The girl wearing glasses is Meg.

The rotund girl is Amanda.

The girl with pig tails is Susan.

The small girl remaining is presumably Olivia.

Clara is not depicted here, or anywhere else in this storybook.

Wendy is not ever depicted in this storybook, at least not as a little girl. Does the little princess doll, later on in the storybook, represent her? I’ll discuss that question in a future blog-post.
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There are a number of mysteries that we now face in trying to explain the story of “The Little Princess” storybook:

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“The Little Princess” storybook continues:

Then one day, her mummy and daddy died suddenly.

The Princess, too, disappeared, and the girl was left all alone.

The subtitling for this page ends the second sentence “leaving the girl all alone”, but the actual writing inside of the storybook itself ends the sentence “and the girl was left all alone.”

One can get a good look at this part of “The Little Princess” storybook by downloading the pdf file. See my previous post: Download or Print Out Rule of Rose Storybooks

The storybook illustration shows an airship with the name “Rose 03″ on it. This name puzzles me. Was the airship on which Jennifer and her parents traveled, and crashed, truly named “Rose 03″? It seems like quite a coincidence: Jennifer went from traveling on the airship “Rose 03″ to living at the “Rose Garden” orphanage.

I can easily imagine that the fantasy airship of the orphan’s airship game might be named “Rose” to match the name of the orphanage. After all, the orphans are pretending that the orphanage itself is an airship. But the airship of the storybook illustration is not that fantasy airship. It is the airship on which Jennifer’s parents died when the airship crashed.

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The Little Princess storybook coverThe Little Princess storybook blank~

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It is amazing to me that, as much as I have studied the Rule of Rose game, I can still discover important features of the story that I had missed up until now.

The continual growth of the text of “The Little Princess” storybook, as the Rule of Rose game progresses, is a story element of which I was previously unaware. I must confess that I just let that storybook sit, without re-examination, in the Rubbish Bin, once I was able to clear it from my inventory during “The Unlucky Clover Field” chapter of the game. But the game-player misses an important part of the progression of the Rule of Rose story by doing this.

In all of my time spent on Rule of Rose forums, I don’t recall reading any posts mentioning the on-going growth of the text of “The Little Princess” storybook. I wonder, how many other players of the game know about it?

The growth of the “The Little Princess” storybook-text is well-known in “The Little Princess” chapter itself. When Jennifer first receives the storybook on the bus, it is blank except for the cover. At the bus stop, however, Jennifer finds that there is now a story that has appeared inside of the book. Later on, when Jennifer reaches the attic of the orphanage, Joshua prompts Jennifer to continue reading the story and Jennifer discovers that the story text has lengthened from what it was before. This much all Rule of Rose game-players know.

We were meant, however, by the game authors, to take a cue from this and to keep examining the storybook for further text-growth throughout the progression of the game. This cue, I’m afraid, went completely over my head. I put “The Little Princess” in the Rubbish Bin to make room in my inventory for other items, didn’t re-examine it, and thereby entirely missed that aspect of the progression of the Rule of Rose story.

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The “Stray Dog and the Lying Princess” storybook of Rule of Rose has a story that seems to be adapted from the fable by Aesop entitled “The Shepherd’s Boy and the Wolf” (commonly known as “The Boy Who Cried Wolf”).

Here is a translation of this fable by George Tyler Townsend:

The Shepherd’s Boy and the Wolf

A Shepherd-boy, who watched a flock of sheep near a village, brought out the villagers three or four times by crying out, “Wolf! Wolf!” and when his neighbors came to help him, laughed at them for their pains. The Wolf, however, did truly come at last. The Shepherd-boy, now really alarmed, shouted in an agony of terror: “Pray, do come and help me; the Wolf is killing the sheep”; but no one paid any heed to his cries, nor rendered any assistance. The Wolf, having no cause of fear, at his leisure lacerated or destroyed the whole flock.

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BearAndPrincessTiedBackToBack~
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The “Once Upon a Time” storybook, in Rule of Rose, has no text other than its title. So understanding it requires analyzing the pictures that tell its story.

The title, “Once Upon a Time” is on the cover, as is a picture of two chairs, with a coil of rope by one of the chairs.

Further into the storybook, we see two girls holding hands as they sit together in these chairs. By their holding hands we know that they are friends to each other.

Further still into the storybook we see that these two girls are bound by rope, each to their own chair, as they continue to sit side-by-side. I propose that this image is a variant on the image that we see in the picture that accompanies this post.

In the picture (above, accompanying this article) we see the Prince Joshua-the-bear doll tied to the Little Princess doll as they sit on the two throne chairs of the Aristocrat club.

You can get several better views of these two dolls tied together on the throne chairs, in context, in this You Tube video: Prince and Princess Tied Together On The Chairs.

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stitched gooatOn the next page of “The Goat Sisters” storybook, the text reads:

Little sister wanted to read big sister the letter. So she fetched it from sister’s stomach.

The accompanying drawing in the storybook shows one goat, holding the letter in one hand and scissors in the other hand, having cut open the other goat. Large splatters of blood emanate from the cut goat. Due to the primitive drawing style, it isn’t clear to me, from the drawing on this page, which goat is which, or where on the body the cut goat has been cut.

In the drawing on the next page of “The Goat Sisters” storybook, however, it becomes clear that the cut goat has had her abdomen cut open, and Diana’s necktie can be seen lying next to the cut goat, confirming that the goat with the cut-open abdomen is the Diana-goat.

In “The Goat Sister’s” storybook of Rule of Rose, it is clearly the Meg-goat (“little sister”) that has used the scissors to cut open the Diana-goat (“big sister”). But in the rest of the Rule of Rose game, the symbolism of the cut-open abdomen, and the symbolism of the use of the scissors, is shared between the goats Mary and Sally, and is shared between Meg and Diana.

The only time that I’ve seen a black goat-imp in the Rule of Rose game is during the dual goat-imps bosses battle of this “Goat Sisters” chapter. The black goat-imp boss has scissors as a weapon and a gaping abdominal wound. But the white goat-imp boss and every other goat imp (all of which are white) that I’ve seen each have a gaping abdominal wound as well. And, in “The Funeral” chapter, the white goat imp that replaces Meg in the library uses scissors as a weapon.

So scissors have been used by both a black goat-imp and a white goat-imp; and all goat-imps, whether black or white, have gaping abdominal wounds. Although the picture that I have included with this post shows a white goat-imp with the abdominal wound stitched closed, I haven’t found this imp in the game. If anybody sees it, let me know where it is to be found, please.

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blankstorybook

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Who wrote the storybooks?

Did the storybooks actually exist in Jennifer’s forgotten past? Or have they only existed in her dream?

If the storybooks have only existed in Jennifer’s dream, then the true author of the books (despite the attribution within the dream to anybody else) would be Jennifer herself… Jennifer’s dreaming mind would have written them.

I think that there are some examples in the game (in synch with the above idea) where it seems to me that Jennifer’s dreaming mind speaks to her through other characters in the dream:

In “The Bird of Happiness” chapter, Eleanor says to Jennifer (at the beginning of the chapter), “Have you found what you’re looking for? Something dear to you?”

In the “Mermaid Princess” chapter, Diana says to Jennifer (at the beginning of the chapter), “You should be looking for your own precious thing.”

In “The Goat Sisters” chapter, Meg says to Jennifer (at the beginning of the chapter), “There must be something very important to you… why don’t you go find it?”

Could it be that the storybooks of Rule of Rose are actually a way for Jennifer’s dreaming mind to speak to her through the guise of being something written by Gregory?

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To get a good look at “The Goat Sisters” storybook of Rule of Rose, see the instructions in my post “Download or Print Out Rule of Rose Storybooks” about how to download this storybook.

Opening the cover of “The Goat Sisters”, there is a drawing inside of the two goats touching their heads together. Above the point where their heads touch together floats a tiny heart.

In the visual presentation of the storybook one can see that there is a written line of text on this page, but the game doesn’t give a subtitle for the line of text. It is very hard to read this line from the game, and the gamescript faq from GameSpot/GameFAQs omits the line, but from the downloaded “Goat Sisters” storybook I can clearly read it as being:

The Goat Sisters got along fabulously.

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eyeglasses and necktie~

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To get a good look at “The Goat Sisters” storybook of Rule of Rose, see the instructions in my post “Download or Print Out Rule of Rose Storybooks” about how to download this storybook.

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The subtitle that we are given for this storybook when making use of the function “look”, rather than the function “use”, in the inventory is:

Storybook: The Goat Sisters

A sad, sad story about the goat sisters

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The cover of “The Goat Sisters” storybook has a drawing showing two goats that are both tethered to the same pole by rope. Above the drawing is the title: “The Goat Sisters“.

There are features of the goats of this storybook that mark the goats as representing Meg and Diana. Meg wears eye glasses, and so does one of the two goats. Diana wears a sailor suit bandana necktie, and so does the other goat, the one that isn’t wearing eye glasses. See Meg’s eye glasses and Diana’s necktie in the picture accompanying this post.

I believe that the connection of the goats via rope is a way to symbolize personal relationship. This variety of use of rope symbolism occurs many times in Rule of Rose, and I intend to do a post, soon, which will deal with this in more depth. For now, I’ll venture the opinion that this use of rope symbolism relates, at least in part, to the way that rope/thread/cord symbolism for personal relationships is used in Japan and other Asian cultures. One can see a use of this rope symbolism in this YouTube video of the preview-trailer for Takeshi Kitano’s film “Dolls” (notice the red rope connecting the young man and young woman, and notice the subtitle, later, that says “Three tales of love bound to one another with a piece of red cord): “Dolls” preview.

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